Adult Education

Creating Presence in the Age of Continual Change: Judicial Educators Leading the Edge

Dr. Maureen Conner

In 1995, I wrote an article for NASJE News titled “Creating Presence”. I heard from many colleagues about how helpful the concepts were in establishing the importance of education in the courts. Now, two decades later, creating presence is even more important. External forces that will not abate increasingly drive contemporary change. Directly meeting the challenges of change with a clear vision and unified voice is required to thrive in what will likely be a very exciting and frustrating time.

My Experience with the Mentor Program

Dr. Anthony Simones, second from left, with Lee Ann Barnhardt, third from left. Photo by Margaret Allen.

Even though I had known success in other arenas, I was new to the field of judicial education, so it seemed I could benefit from regular conversations and consultations with someone experienced in a similar job. I agreed to be assigned a mentor, and it was one of the best decisions I ever made.

How Judicial Educators Can Create “Presence” Within the Judicial Branch

On February 11, 2015, former NASJE President Karen Thorson presented a webcast about how state judicial educators can create a sense of presence within the judicial branch and ensure that the educator’s voice is heard when speaking to authority. Her presentation focused on three main questions: 1) What is presence?, 2) Why is it valuable, and 3) How do you earn it?

Conducting Effective Training through Careful Evaluation

A Guide to Conducting Effective Training Evaluations: Recommendations, Strategies and Tools for Dependency Court Improvement Programs

The National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges (NCJFCJ), as part of the National Resource Center on Legal and Judicial Issues, a service of the Children’s Bureau, developed A Guide to Conducting Effective Training Evaluations: Recommendations, Strategies and Tools for Dependency Court Improvement Programs. The Guide assists in identifying training needs, developing training methodologies and evaluation tools, and assessing training outcomes.

Fruitvale Station: A Review and Discussion

Fruitvale Station

by Nancy Smith, Field Trainer, Pima County Superior Court, Tucson The film Fruitvale Station is a film any judicial educator could use as a basis for a serious discussion of racism in America. The film illustrates the chasms that separate…

Thumbs up for NASJE’s new curriculum resource

Before I entered the field of judicial education a little less than a year ago, I spent the previous twenty years as a college professor. Teaching was something I had to learn on my own, through trial and error. I would have profited enormously from guidelines and suggestions of the type provided in these materials.

Thiagi Gameletter

May issue of Thiagi GameLetter You can read it by visiting Here are the contents of this issue: COOPETITION, a review activity that resembles a TV game show. A tool kit article with 11 different interactive storytelling techniques. A…